Wandering: water & landscape

Stephanie Taylor, artist/writer, a 4th generation Californian is inspired by trips to her ancestral home in Norway, followed water, drop by drop, from glaciers to streams, rivers, lakes and fiords. She is a painter, sculptor and essayist. She is a freelance editorial contributor to the Sacramento Bee with her series, "California Sketches," at sacbee.com/333/index.html, and stephanietaylorart.com

twitter.com/staylorart:

    A few images. Visit http://stephanietaylorart.blogspot.com for blog and more.

    — 5 days ago
    #Galapagos 
    rhamphotheca:

Blue-footed Boobies in Trouble
by Richard Kemeney
Perfectly in step, this blue-footed booby (Sula nebouxii) couple on Santa Cruz Island in the Galápagos appear to be on the right track with their graceful, elaborate mating dance.
But fancy footwork isn’t enough to maintain the Ecuadorian booby populace. Recent research has shown that these majestic birds aren’t making enough baby boobies, and population is shrinking.
The dance, which involves whistling, flapping and both birds marching around on their brilliantly blue feet, can impressively last for several hours. But they should be focusing on dinner, not dancing: the decline is probably due to lack of sardines, the birds’ favourite food. Without them, they may have the energy to boogie, but not to breed.
Journal reference: Avian Conservation and Ecology
(via: New Scientist)
Image: Tui De Roy/ Minden Pictures

    rhamphotheca:

    Blue-footed Boobies in Trouble

    by Richard Kemeney

    Perfectly in step, this blue-footed booby (Sula nebouxii) couple on Santa Cruz Island in the Galápagos appear to be on the right track with their graceful, elaborate mating dance.

    But fancy footwork isn’t enough to maintain the Ecuadorian booby populace. Recent research has shown that these majestic birds aren’t making enough baby boobies, and population is shrinking.

    The dance, which involves whistling, flapping and both birds marching around on their brilliantly blue feet, can impressively last for several hours. But they should be focusing on dinner, not dancing: the decline is probably due to lack of sardines, the birds’ favourite food. Without them, they may have the energy to boogie, but not to breed.

    Journal reference: Avian Conservation and Ecology

    (via: New Scientist)

    Image: Tui De Roy/ Minden Pictures

    — 4 weeks ago with 481 notes
    More scary news →

    Folsom Dam on the American River just east of Sacramento, for example, was designed on assumptions — of wet year data.  They’ve just spent millions raising the dam to allow for more water. Damn.

    — 4 weeks ago
    #Drought  #american river 
    Follow me following Darwin, camera, sketchbook and paints in hand.

    Follow me following Darwin, camera, sketchbook and paints in hand.

    — 4 weeks ago
    #galapagos  #travel  #travel sketch 
    Last year, or perhaps the year before, the City of Sacramento replanted the iconic medians of T Street- at great expense. The drought was full on then and I wondered what they were thinking. Why didn’t they plant/seed drought resistant plants then, plan for shade tolerant landscaping? Now, they’re letting all that grass die, and like the prior post, it’s ridiculous.

    Last year, or perhaps the year before, the City of Sacramento replanted the iconic medians of T Street- at great expense. The drought was full on then and I wondered what they were thinking. Why didn’t they plant/seed drought resistant plants then, plan for shade tolerant landscaping? Now, they’re letting all that grass die, and like the prior post, it’s ridiculous.

    — 1 month ago
    #water  #sacramento  #Drought 
    Editorial: Overwatering is a crime – except for state’s biggest water user - The Sacramento Bee →
    — 1 month ago
    #water  #california  #Drought 
    The Drake’s Bay family will be forced to shut down the oyster farm at the end of this month. I visited in April 2013. Here, two long term employees contemplate their future, and that of all the extended families of this sustainable operation. Worst fears - realized.
Read the SacBee essay:
http://www.sacbee.com/2013/05/19/5429844/point-reyes-shellfish-bounty-faces.html

    The Drake’s Bay family will be forced to shut down the oyster farm at the end of this month. I visited in April 2013. Here, two long term employees contemplate their future, and that of all the extended families of this sustainable operation. Worst fears - realized.

    Read the SacBee essay:

    http://www.sacbee.com/2013/05/19/5429844/point-reyes-shellfish-bounty-faces.html

    — 1 month ago
    #oysters  #drakes bay oyster farm  #sustainability 

    Forests, fire, fuel, adaptation & management. How can humans possibly respond to wilderness that evolved to burn? 

    — 1 month ago
    #forest  #adaptation  #california  #sierra 
    "Richmond Oil Refinery," acrylic on canvas, 30x40"

    "Richmond Oil Refinery," acrylic on canvas, 30x40"

    — 2 months ago
    Restore The Colorado River Basin →
    — 2 months ago

    Carmel River estuary.

    — 4 months ago
    Bernie Krause: How Does Listening To Nature Teach Us About Changing Habitats? →
    — 5 months ago